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Anaerobic Palmer to Matanuska Glacier Alaska

5 out of 5 based on 5 customer ratings
(5 customer reviews)

New to DVD and Download. Explore the wild frontier of Alaska as we ride 30 miles and climb 2500 feet. Huge wide open views, snow capped mountains, and rushing rivers await!

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Product Description

About The Ride

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This Cycling Exercise Workout DVD and downloadable video

was captured in high definition and Dolby Digital sound.

This groundbreaking workout video has been updated to the on demand dash 4.0! Enjoy a 2 hour 10 minute visually stunning ride from Palmer to the Manituska glacier. These wild roads will challenge you with tough climbs, fast descents and a brisk effort as we ride past snow capped mountains, rushing rivers, and incredible dense green forests. This 30 mile ride will both inspire and test you. Once you’re done, you can brag to your friends that you rode 30 miles, climbed 2500 feet in the wilderness of Alaska!

Watch for free on OnDemandWorkout.com

The Stats

Video Details

Length 2:10:00 Training tools available
Format NTSC DVD or 1080p h264 Download Heart rate yes
Audio Track 1 yes Gear ratio yes
Audio Track 2 yes Resistance yes
Audio Track 3 yes Cadence yes
Region 0 Hill profile yes
Aspect 16×9 Heart rate profile yes
Resolution 480i DVD 1080i BD 1080p Download Speed yes
Date created 12/25/2015
Elevation yes
Produced by BtBoP Power yes
Published by ODW Timer no
Copyright copyright 2017 ODW Coaching narrative yes

Additional Information

Location

Alaska

Workout Type

Anaerobic Workouts

Format

Download, DVD, Stream

Workout Notes

Matanuska Glacier Narrative

Getting back on the horse after injury
resilience
understand your limitations
know your emotional condition
who are you without your sport?
you lose your physical health and sense of invincibility
loss of self esteem
alienation / isolation
Denial; Anger; Bargaining; Depression; Acceptance
• #1 BE SAD –
• #2 DEAL WITH WHAT IS –
• #3 SET NEW, MORE REALISTIC GOALS FOR YOURSELF –
• #4 MAINTAIN A POSITIVE ATTITUDE, NO MATTER WHAT –
• #5 TAKE AN ACTIVE PART IN YOUR HEALING –
• #6 CONTINUE TO “PRACTICE” AND “WORK OUT”.
• #7 SEEK OUT THE SUPPORT OF YOUR TEAMMATES –
• #8 THINK ABOUT HOW TO USE YOUR SPORTS LEARNING AND EXPERIENCE IN OTHER AREAS OF YOUR LIFE –
• #9 IF NECESSARY, SEEK OUT A COUNSELOR-
• #10 BE PATIENT–

clearly define objectives
routine
limit stress
friendships
reboot
get in touch with yourself
• Look at the successes in your life and see what you did that helped nail it.
• Look at when you’ve been on top of your game and see what allowed that to happen.
• Look at what you’re most proud of and dig into what it is that matters most to you.
• Look at what you’ve always been able to do brilliantly without really thinking, and see what talents you have in your bones.
• Look at how you reacted in the bad times and see what you honored or what you expressed.
Workout
Listen to your physical therapist!
Diversify workout routine
Don’t ignore the pain – it’s trying to tell you something
• constantly monitor and mediate
• ice
• anti-inflammatory
• massage
• elevation
• compression
create an even better foundation – you knew what you were before, start over and get better!
o range of motion
o balance
o flexibility
o massage
Positive attitude – this is a rebuilding effort that will make you better than you were before.
Set small goals and build
use friends to push you, encourage you – share your results
Use measurement techniques
o power
o size
o distance
o speed
Keep a workout journal
o activity
o data
o goals
o goals met
Give yourself more rest days
focus on diet
reward yourself
resistance training – build up muscle density from atrophy
muscle isolation –
• tens unit
• trigger point
atrophy
disuse atrophy in which the muscles waste away due to lack of exercise,
and neurogenic atrophy – injury / nerve disease

– is not muscle loss – it’s a loss of muscle activation from the deactivation of nerves
o injury
o pain
o arthritis
o age
Key word is pain – avoid pain – treat pain – allow growth and recovery —> inflammation bad
Cross education – train one side at a time
find movement patterns that don’t hurt
pretty patterns – focus on what looks good
Give yourself time – 2 years

5 reviews for Anaerobic Palmer to Matanuska Glacier Alaska

  1. 5 out of 5

    :

    Cycling coaches can tell when their athletes are doing indoor training: No “junk miles.” Ride to this video and you’ll do a quality workout.
    Since the format and appearance may be unfamiliar, Paul carefully explains the graphics used (dashboard) and both the objectives of the ride and how to achieve them, whether it’s on an indoor trainer or spin bike. That not only gets us on track, but removes any sense of “huh, what’s this” from the workout.
    After that, he takes us on a super ride through the wilds of Alaska, sometimes through a powerful overcast sky, and at others (the latter part) during partly sunny skies. Both are beautiful, as the landscape and views are breathtaking and commanding. As usual, the video quality is excellent, and the dashboard only appears as necessary, affording us with a great opportunity to get into the ride. That ride lasts a very reasonable two hours but, as I’ve said elsewhere, it need not be ridden in one, fell swoop. It’s a steady climb for the first 90+ minutes, though by no means overtaxing, and you can mix and match segments as desired.
    An excellent and beautiful ride that combats the doldrums of indoor training, making these workouts into a real gas. Get on board!

  2. 5 out of 5

    :

    I am so exhausted, but at the same time very excited because I have just finished an amazing ride from Palmer to Manituska in Alaska.

    I have always wanted to visit Alaska, and in front of my big screen TV it almost feels like I am there.
    This 2 hour and 10 minute long ride is along a very busy road where you almost only see trees, so it’s nice to get some glimpses of rushing rivers and beautiful
    snowcapped mountains from a second camera. I was hoping to see a bear along the way, but for Paul’s sake, I am glad we didn’t …

    I like that the infopanel on the screen doesn’t take away so much of the view, and it’s nice that I have a choice if I want to listen to Paul
    during the ride or listen to my own music. I chose Paul because he pushes me all the way and gives me the motivation I need to get up
    those steep hills.

    It is a lot of climbing during this ride, so be prepared for sore legs but it is a great workout. I will ride it again soon, just so I can see the
    “postcard” view from Manituska one more time. I can assure you – it is worth the pain and struggle.

  3. 5 out of 5

    :

    We can’t always ride in the mountains and beautiful scenery, and sometimes we feel like we don’t want to ride at all. It was another wet day in winter-time and I was recovering from a bad cold, but I gritted my teeth, put on my cycling clothes and jumped on the cycle trainer. As I began to pedal, I started up Paul Gallas’ video “Palmer to Manituska”. Manituska is a glacier in Alaska, and at the end of the video you’re rewarded with a wonderful view of the glacier — but you have to work for it first.

    The video started at a great warm-up pace, and I was soon into it, following the gear and cadence changes as Paul carefully explained how the video worked and what all the parts of the dashboard meant. My breathing got harder, I began to sweat, and I found myself getting a great workout despite my illness.

    Palmer to Manituska is a beautiful ride through some incredibly remote and mountainous terrain. At one point Paul mentioned that he felt very alone while riding, despite the occasional campervan or car, and you could really feel that when riding along with the video. It felt like an adventure, even though I was cycling at home.

    The video quality is excellent as always, and the dashboard and other on-screen displays are very well thought out. Paul is an amazing guide for your exercise workout. The only thing I did find a bit disconcerting, and this isn’t Paul’s fault at all, is that he had to wipe the camera lens a few times when it got covered in raindrops. But it’s better to clean the lens than leave big drops blocking your view, so I’ll forgive him that. The view was certainly worth it.

    At one point I heard a strange noise and stopped the video, wondering if the noise was something wrong with the recording, but it was just torrential rain pounding on the roof. I laughed, started the video again, and kept pedalling.

    This video has a slightly lower cadence than some of Paul’s other videos, which my legs found easier, but still it was an excellent workout and my body felt it at the end.

    I particularly enjoyed Paul’s fascinating commentary. I’ve studied sports science at university, but I still learned several things I didn’t know from this video. Paul’s very in-depth commentary on how to recover from injury and surgery is something that all cyclists will have to deal with at some stage, and I found it personally very relevant.

    Even if you haven’t tried any of Paul’s “BtBop” series of videos before, this is an excellent choice to get started with. He explains everything, the commentary is excellent, and the views are worth the hard work.

    One thing I really enjoyed about this video was that the on-screen dashboard completely disappeared at times, leaving you just with the view of the mountains, forests and rivers. You’re enjoying the view and the feeling of your legs and lungs working hard, but at the same time you know that you have to keep going, following the same gear and cadence as you climb that hill or complete a long grinding straight. The silence on the commentary is like Paul telling you: “right, now it’s your turn”. You’re left to your own devices, and know exactly what you have to do. And, within a minute or two, the dashboard comes back just when you need to change gear or alter your cadence again.

    I felt that this balance between following the on-screen dashboard and occasionally being left to your own devices was perfect, allowing you to really enjoy both the ride, and the workout. I can’t wait to do it again!

  4. 5 out of 5

    :

    I’m not sure what I can add that hasn’t already been said! I enjoyed this ride thoroughly! I’ve always wanted to visit Alaska. I’ve never thought about riding my bike there. Now I can do both. Well at least on video.

    I’ve done plenty of miles on my turbo trainer and being honest they are just bad. If you’re like me, and you have to ride the trainer, at least do it while riding to one of CVO’s videos. It has great scenery, and a nice upbeat feel to it. I’ll give it a solid 8/10.

  5. 5 out of 5

    :

    Such a killer ride! Great workout. Love Paul’s commentary on this video and it helped me realize I wasn’t alone in the world of sports injuries.
    Great footage of Alaska and you do not need to do the whole video at once. I broke it up due to time constraints and lactic pain levels. Lol. This is an awesome workout with a great partner pushing you along. The footage of Alaska was great. Too bad it wasn’t a sun filled day to enhance his footage.
    I recommend to EVERYONE who wants a good ride with excellent scenery.

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